What We Do

Thank you for your interest. Here’s a list of our current projects.

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After she finished her work on one of her fields Mrs. Ruai Urlaka, who was part of the GHI study 2016, walks towards Langi village in Odisha, India.
After she finished her work on one of her fields Mrs. Ruai Urlaka, who was part of the GHI study 2016, walks towards Langi village in Odisha, India. Photo credit: Enrico Fabian. Commissioned by Welthungerhilfe.

Establishing a sustainable agricultural model

Living Farms has been promoting eco-friendly agricultural practices and working with marginalized farmers from mid 2000s. This approach includes:

  • - Working with forest dependent, marginalized and landless farmers and villages to establish a local community led model for sustainable farming
  • - In this model the farmers would grow and maintain their own seeds in a community owned organic seed bank, use natural /organic fertilizers like compost and bio pesticides 
  • - Market their produce and create value additions
  • - Use traditional multi-cropping (for example food crops like millets) instead of "monocultures" and a single cash crop

How we help farmers

Living Farms has organized knowledge workshops, helped organize farmers into self-help groups, introduced new concepts like NPM (non-pesticide management) at the community and local gram panchayat levels. Our teams have also helped introduce the concepts of seed hybridization, helped farmers procure organic seeds, establish their own seed banks and provided initial help through a grain bank. Living Farms has also helped farmers gain information around the benefits of multi-cropping for stronger food security, especially in the rain-sparse months of the year. 

 

Adivasis in India and forest dependent communities reorienting agriculture sustainable farming organic

Project Impact

  • - 1000 small farmers practice sustainable agriculture methods
  • - 400 households stopped using chemicals and switched to local seeds and locally produced organic fertilization.
  • - The project has brought new knowledge to the farmers on non-chemical approaches to pest management. 3000 farmers using sustainable practices saved INR 1200-1500 per acre.
  • - There are 27 community seeds banks established in the project villages, managed by village women. Around 4500 farmers have benefited from seed banks. Seed banks are offering 1,000 small farmers seeds for the cultivation of at least 20 crops.

 

Ask for more information on the project

Contact us at info@living-farms.org

 

 

Different varieties of seeds from the same plant species are seen after Mr. Loknath Nauri, who was part of the GHI study 2016, showed his vast collection of different seeds he stored for further planting on his fields in Kerendiguda village, Odisha, India.
Different varieties of seeds from the same plant species are seen after Mr. Loknath Nauri, who was part of the GHI study 2016, showed his vast collection of different seeds he stored for further planting on his fields in Kerendiguda village, Odisha, India. Photo credit: Enrico Fabian. Commissioned by Welthungerhilfe.

Achieving food security and health

Tribals and landless laborers have faced extreme food security issues, especially in "dry seasons". As a result, maternal and child health issues, malnutrition and related illnesses have loomed large. Our approach to solving this issue has involved:

  • - Working with women's groups, schools, families, public health workers, tribals, forest dependent and landless farmers and villages to make changes at a community and family level
  • - Supporting multi-cropping to increase crop diversity and include traditional food crops like millets (long duration seeds for 'rain scarce months')
  • - Promoting and establishing the rationale for high nutrition uncultivated forest foods 
  • - Capacity building for farmers and women leaders for home gardens, diversity in plantation and accessing government schemes especially for health
  • - Organizing workshops on intergenerational nutrition, child and maternal health, student awareness programs, village health days and Adivasi food festivals showcasing high nutrition uncultivated crop.

How we help communities

Living Farms has organized knowledge workshops in partnership with Anganwadi workers, women's rights groups, schools, ANMs and ASHA workers. These workshops have helped share knowledge on maternal and child health, sanitation, balanced diets and intergenerational malnutrition. These workshops have also shared knowledge on government facilities that these marginalized groups can avail of for their health needs. Our teams have also helped farmers, families and communities see the benefits of traditional multi-cropping, seed management, uncultivated forest crops and organic farming. 

 

Adivasis in India and forest dependent communities fighting hunger malnutrition in odisha

Project Impact

  • - Infant Mortality Rates are reduced to 85 in 2014 from 131 in 2011. A 13% Reduction in New Born Death was recorded in 2014 compared to 2011. Global Acute Malnutrition has been reduced to 17.1% in 2014.
  • - 99% of children have availed complete immunization. 100% severely malnutritioned children are now referred to primary healthcare centers
  • - 79% mothers accessed the Janani Suraksha Yojana and 99% accessed the MAMATA Yojana. 79% deliveries are institutionalized. 93% of pregnant mothers have received supplementary nutrition.
  • - 500 women in 40 villages have been trained to prepare ORS at household levels. 
  • - 26% of schools have better access to safe drinking water and improved sanitation and 50% school management committees have been trained on health issues. 99% villages conduct village health & nutrition day meetings.
  • - The percentage of farmers having food scarcity between 3~8 months has changed, from 76% to 29%. 1500 households have grown home gardens, producing sufficient vegetables for their own use for at least 8 months.
  • - 2000 adivasi and dalit households, in 50 villages in Rayagada district will have access to increased food at household level during the 3 out of 7 food stress / hunger months in a year
  • - 1770 women farmers have developed winter home gardens. The average sizes vary from 2-5 cents of homestead, each growing 12-15 varieties of vegetables. On an average each of these families has harvested 80-90 Kilograms of vegetables by December 2014
  • - 47% of families now have a diet diversity score of 4 and more. 521 farmers from 50 villages have decided to increase their crop variety from 3 to 8. 171 compost pits have been made by 93 farmers in 21 villages for organic farming.
  • - 90% below poverty line community members are now aware of entitlements and are receiving provisions.

 

Ask for more information on the project

Contact us at info@living-farms.org

 

A landscape view from a field of Mr. Singina Patika who was part of the GHI study 2016 in Langi village, Odisha, India.
A landscape view from a field of Mr. Singina Patika who was part of the GHI study 2016 in Langi village, Odisha, India. Photo credit: Enrico Fabian. Commissioned by Welthungerhilfe.

Regenerating the forests

Forest dependent communities and tribals share a symbiotic relationships with the forest ecosystems. From food through uncultivated forest crops, to connectors of their cultural ethos, forests represent an entire world. Unabated deforestation has strongly affected the forest cover and is leading to climate change issues. This deeply affects forest dependent communities culturally as well as in tangible terms of health and nutrition. Living Farms activities to help regenerate forests include:

  • - Working with communities to establish a community biodiversity management plan 
  • - Helping set up forest protection committees advocating forest regeneration and conservation 
  • - Promoting and establishing the rationale for high nutrition uncultivated forest foods 
  • - Capacity building for communities, especially women leaders to regenerate degraded forest land through plantation drives
  • - Organizing workshops on climate change, forest diversity, selection of planted species and sustainable farming 

How we help communities

Living Farms has organized knowledge workshops in partnership local communities. These workshops have helped share knowledge on forest regeneration, climate change and bio-diversity. These workshops have also shared knowledge specifically for creating local nurseries and plantations on degraded forest land. Our teams have also helped communities, farmers and families map the status of their forests, seeds, village and water commons to restore and regenerate incorporating valuable climate change information in their efforts. Awareness campaigns about government schemes and help has also been shared with the communities.

A lot of these project activities have been a part of  the project “Forest for Life and Livelihood Improvement of Adivasi Groups in Odisha” implemented with support from BMZ and Deutsche Welthungerlife, Germany between 2011 and 2015.

 

Adivasis in India and forest dependent communities forest regeneration degradation biodiversity Odisha

Project Impact

  • - Forest protection committees have been initiated in all the 94 target villages with 75 taking active interest in forest conservation
  • - 5,000 households and 100 villages have land rights or have started the process of registration. 
  • - 50% of the 100 project villages have a Community Biodiversity Management Plan and have submitted this to the state authorities for implementation. Forty two villages have planted horticulture species on their land with support from the government.
  • - 145 women and 65 men were trained to set up village nurseries. In previous years they had raised nurseries of 3000 saplings each year
  • - 4000 hectares of degraded forest were being regenerated with the active participation by 82 villages planting 1,50,000 seedlings of locally appropriate 18 forest species and direct plantation of another 1,40,000 seeds. Forest user committees of 78 villages planted 1,40,000 seedlings and had sown 1,15,000 seeds directly on degraded forest land. A total of 3,40,000 seedlings have been planted and reports showed that 70% of the plants have survived.

 

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